Be [ Artful ]

CRAFT-DESIGN-ART
almost-seen:

2010, skateboards, prayer rugs. Mounir Fatmi

almost-seen:

2010, skateboards, prayer rugs. Mounir Fatmi

(via thirstymuslim)

oecologia:

Colorful Layers of Sedimentary Rock (Valley of Fire, Nevada) by Sean Bagshaw.

oecologia:

Colorful Layers of Sedimentary Rock (Valley of Fire, Nevada) by Sean Bagshaw.

(via androphilia)

ninikills:

Stromae type and pattern by Bold

Over the course of the year, we developed several visuals to promote the release of Stromae’s second album, which goes by the name of ”√”. Stromae asked us to come up with a different pattern for each song, which could subsequently be made ​​into clothing. Each pattern reflects the lyrics as well as the specific musical influences of each song.

(via los-suspiros-del-moro)

critink:

When beginning a tattoo apprenticeship, fruits are usually practiced on before skin.

And also, these just look cool.

(via moodboardmess)


archaeologicalnews:

image

The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archeologists in England.

"They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick…

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

(via gremlinowl)

athousandfacets:

SHIRLI MATATIA
androphilia:

Moroccan tattoos

androphilia:

Moroccan tattoos

(via androphilia)